Kentucky Fried Chicken' KFC'Denies Any Application For Felons?


If your A Felon Don't wast your time putting a application on KBP site https://kbpjobs.clickandhire.net/


Because you will never see it because if you check Yes you have been convicted of a Felon. You get this.. check out the screen shot of whats happens next below Link




If you can't see it it says

Keep in mind before you fill out an app on this site it says
Please complete the following questions. This information may be verified and will be your information to apply for a future position. If you log off for any reason (run out of time, lose Internet connection, problems with your computer, etc.), you will receive a follow-up email to complete the process. This email runs on a delay and is typically sent out at night. However, you can log back in right away to complete the process. Please make a note of the EXACT identifying information (name, phone, and email) used in your initial login. If you have any difficulty, click on the Support link located on every screen.
This says nothing about a felon!

First off this NOT KFC's site! Their site is kfc.com or jobswithkfc.com.They will at least give you a chance to fill out a application,a chance to see who you are NOW NOT THEN!I don't know if they hire felons or not but It's worth a try.

ARE YOU AT LEAST 16 YEARS OF AGE? Yes or No

IF YOU ARE HIRED, CAN YOU SHOW PROOF OF AGE? Yes or No

IF YOU ARE HIRED, CAN YOU SHOW THAT YOU ARE LEGALLY QUALIFIED TO WORK IN THIS COUNTRY? Yes or No

DO YOU HAVE ACCESS TO RELIABLE TRANSPORTATION TO GET TO AND FROM WORK? Yes or No

HAVE YOU EVER BEEN CONVICTED OF A FELONY? Yes Or No


First let me tell you about KBP.

KBP Foods

KBP Foods owns 64 restaurants in 5 states, and will generate sales of over $80 million in 2011. The roots of our company began many years ago.

A BRIEF HISTORY
Our story begins in Grand Junction, CO, when a father and son from California decided to combine their years of experience and become partners in the restaurant franchisee business. They started in January 1999 with 5 KFC restaurants in Colorado. Growth to 69 stores in just over 10 years was accomplished through both acquisition and significant operational and financial improvements within existing restaurants.

In September 1999, 7 stores located in the Quad Cities were purchased and added to the original five. In November 2003, an additional 19 stores in the Kansas City market were added, along with 2 more in KC in 2005. Mid June 2006 brought 12 more stores in Omaha, and in May 2008, 28 stores in Tampa, FL. By the end of 2010, the company operated 69 KFC stores, including several multi-brand sites.

Early 2011 brought changes to the organization when an agreement was entered into between the original owners and KBP Foods to purchase ZMC assets. KBP Foods is on course to grow again before the end of 2011. Follow us on this exciting journey.

KBP Foods’ Corporate Headquarters is located in Overland Park, KS.


A Great Future
Full of Opportunity!

Our mission is to maintain a passion for excellence. We are committed to creating the ultimate in customer satisfaction by developing our people through superior implementation of training and systems. We are a socially responsible, integrity driven company and we strive to be better each and every day.

KBP Foods has been named one of The 50 Fastest-Growing Restaurant Chains and one of the Top 500 Fastest Growing Businesses!





Wow...Second what do they mean You don't meet the minimum requirements? just because I had some problems in the PAST I'm not fit to work at KFC? Well at least for KBP!
Because if you fill out your application on one of KFC's site my only requirements are.

As a Team Member, you could be the smiling face that greets and serves customers. Or you could be the cook that prepares our world famous chicken (and tell your friends you know the “secret” – just kiddin’). Whatever job you do, you know what you do matters – to your team and to your customers.


What are we looking for?

The good news is that your training will teach you everything you need to know to succeed on the job. But there are a few skills you should have from the get-go:

  • You’re a fun and friendly person who values customers and takes absolute pride in everything you do.
  • You like talking – a lot – even to strangers (despite what your Mom told you). This is important, because you’re not able to text message customers.
  • You’ve got attitude - the right kind of course - and understand the need to be on time, all the time. With loads of energy, you understand that work is easier – and more fun – working as a team.
  • And you’re at least 16 years old.

Keep in mind, this is just basic information. You’ll find out more after you apply. And independently-owned franchised or licensed locations may have different requirements.

As you can see KFC warns people of Franchise

We’ve got great jobs for people just starting their careers, looking for a flexible second job or continuing to work after retirement. If you want a fun, flexible job and be part of a winning team, find out now why Life Tastes Better with KFC. Apply today!

People need to see Felons as hard working individuals who made some bad choices in life and can or have made a change.That's why so many go back to their old ways because no one will give them the Time of Day.

If your a Felon try taking A letter of explanation,it explains any gaps in your work history and addresses your criminal record.

Your letter should honestly state your record and time served. You need to take responsibility for your actions and acknowledge the effect it had on others. Talk about the way things have changed as well as what you have done since then. Close by mentioning incentive programs available to the employer if he or she chooses to hire you.

Here is a sample

In May 2007 I was convicted of ______________________. I served 18 months at _________________ for my crime. I know that what I did was wrong. It was a result of poor decision making on my part and it hurt a lot of people. I’ve learned a great lesson and won’t repeat those past mistakes.

While incarcerated I worked as a ___________________ and I completed certifications in ___________________. Since my release I have done some part time work as ___________________ and volunteered my time at __________________. I am looking forward to getting back to work full-time so I can further demonstrate the changes in my life and be a responsible member of society.

I can understand why you may be hesitant to hire someone with my background. However, I am eligible for The Federal Bonding Program which can insure you against any act of dishonesty on my part. Additionally, if you hire me, you will be eligible for Work Opportunity Tax Credits to save you some money this year. I will be happy to provide you more information about those programs when we meet.

If your criminal record goes back several years and you have worked since your release, replace that second paragraph with one highlighting your newly established work history. Also, remove mention of the Tax Credits from the last paragraph as this only applies for ex-felons within a year of release.

Do not send this letter with every résumé submission. Provide the letter when you complete an application and check the box asking about your criminal record history. Bring it with you to review when you get invited in to an interview.

If you apply online there is usually an option to include any additional comments or attach a cover letter. Copy and paste your letter of explanation

Tips

  • Provide a brief description without going into great detail or glorifying the incident
  • Explain what you have done to correct the behavior i.e. treatment, class, training
  • Emphasize why you are a different person today
  • Establish where you would like to be and how this opportunity would benefit you and the prospective employer
  • Consult with a Workforce Development Specialist to proof read your letter for format and more importantly content, to confirm that your message is being delivered in a positive light

Click here for examples.





Your criminal conviction may prevent you

from receiving a Nevada nursing license or nursing assistant certificate

Even if you receive a nursing license or nursing assistant certificate,

you may not be allowed to work in several types of health care settings

The Nevada State Board of Nursing requires all applicants for nursing licenses and nursing assistant certificates to answer five screening questions. These questions address criminal convictions, discipline in another state, chemical dependency, and medical and mental health conditions. In addition, all applicants must submit their fingerprints for an FBI and State of Nevada criminal background check.

Question #2 reads: Have you ever had a criminal conviction, including a misdemeanor or felony, or had a civil judgment rendered against you? If the answer is YES, you must attach to this application the following:

a. A letter of explanation including the date of offense, circumstances leading to the arrest, actual conviction, sentence, additional convictions and current status of sentence;

b. Copies of court documents identifying actual conviction and sentence and current status of sentence (i.e. all fines paid in full, etc). If no documents are available, a letter from the court stating such;

c. FBI and State of Nevada fingerprint reports;

d. A letter from Parole/Probation Officer regarding completion of sentence, if applicable; and
e. A letter of reference from your current/last employer.


Tax Credits for
Hiring Ex-Felons
Both the federal and state governments offer tax credits for hiring ex-felons.
The federal program – Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC) – offers a
federal tax credit of up to $2,400 for each new hire.
To qualify, the employee must be hired not more than one year after the
conviction or release from prison for that felony. Also, the employee must
be a member of a family that had income on an annual basis of 70% or less
of the Bureau of Labor Statistics lower living standard the month in which
the hiring date occurs.
Contact Iowa Workforce Development for more information
(www.iowaworkforce.org ).
In addition, the state of Iowa offers a state tax credit of 65% of the wages
paid to an ex-felon in the first 12 months of employment. The maximum
deduction is $20,000 per employee.
Contact the Iowa Department of Revenue for more information
(www.state.ia.us/tax/index.html )





Felons rights restored

"This is about fundamental fairness," Gov. Crist says.

By STEVE BOUSQUET
Published April 6, 2007



photo
[AP photo]
Republican presidential hopeful Rudy Giuliani, left, makes a stop at Gov. Charlie Crist's office as he campaigns in Florida on Wednesday.

U.S. News Video

TALLAHASSEE - Calling it "simple human justice," Gov. Charlie Crist and two Cabinet members voted Thursday to reverse decades of Florida history by automatically restoring some civil rights to tens of thousands of felons.

The change begins to dismantle a racially tinged obstacle to full citizenship in Florida that dates to the Jim Crow era after the Civil War.

Florida is one of five Southern states that required background investigations and hearings before most felons could again exercise four rights: to vote, serve on a jury, run for public office or apply for a professional license.

"Justice delayed is justice denied, and people are waiting," Crist said as he began a rare special meeting of the Board of Executive Clemency. "This is about fundamental fairness."

The most immediate effect of the change is to grant these civil rights to an estimated 30,000 men and women whose cases have been awaiting action, some of them for years. The restorations do not occur until they complete all terms of their sentences, including payment of restitution.

The list of automatically granted rights does not include gun ownership. Felons still must apply for that on a case-by-case basis.

Criminals convicted of murder or a sex offense will have to live 15 arrest-free years before seeking to regain their civil rights, and serious violent offenders will still have to petition the state for clemency. They can get their rights restored within 30 days if the governor and at least two Cabinet members approve.

State officials estimate that about 515,000 felons, convicted of less severe crimes, will now be eligible for faster restoration of their rights.

Joining Crist in the 3-1 vote were Agriculture Commissioner Charles Bronson, a Republican, and Chief Financial Officer Alex Sink, a Democrat.

Attorney General Bill McCollum, however, called the change "reckless and irresponsible." His criticism of Crist during the meeting appeared to open a rift between the state's two top Republicans.

"I'm just very upset about this," McCollum said. "I think we're making a grave mistake today."

Some civil rights advocates said the change, while long overdue, did not go far enough in helping former convicts return to a normal life. In particular, they objected to a provision in the new rule that requires felons to pay restitution before having their rights restored automatically, arguing that not having those rights makes it more difficult to earn the kind of wage that would allow them to make the payments.

"The compromise and the deal that's been cut doesn't measure up to bringing Florida into the 20th century, much less the 21st century," said Randall Berg of the Florida Justice Institute in Miami. "We've got to do more."

The American Civil Liberties Union said the new clemency rules "fall far short of expectations."

Others were elated.

"Florida has now entered the enlightened age," said Darryl Rouson, a St. Petersburg lawyer and Crist supporter.

As a candidate for governor last year, and in his first weeks in office, Crist demanded an easing of full citizenship barriers for felons, despite a poll showing most Floridians and law enforcement groups which supported his candidacy opposed the idea.

A tense, hourlong debate before the vote exposed deep philosophical differences between McCollum, who replaced Crist as attorney general in January, and the man who calls himself "the people's governor."

McCollum cited opposition from the Florida Sheriffs Association, Florida Police Chiefs Association and Fraternal Order of Police, among others.

He said Florida's high rate of recidivism, estimated as 50 percent within five years of release, will put people at risk: He described hardened criminals getting into homes with new jobs as exterminators or burglar alarm installers.

McCollum said that under the new rules, John Couey, the killer of Jessica Lunsford, could have had his civil rights restored before murdering the Homosassa girl.

Crist, who championed the "antimurder act" partly in response to the Lunsford case, bristled at McCollum's suggestion that it endangers people's lives to grant civil rights to some felons.

"I believe in the appropriate punishment. I'm Chain Gang Charlie," Crist said. "But when someone pays their debt to society, it is paid in full."

Speaking to reporters afterward, McCollum said: "I believe it's a very liberal thing we did today because what we're doing is, we're putting a lot of felons back into the voting booth, back into the jury room and back into your home."

Later, in a remark that required no explanation, Crist introduced his predecessor, Democrat Bob Butterworth, as "the greatest attorney general in the history of the state of Florida."

Butterworth said the new clemency policy "absolutely fights crime" by giving people a chance to get a job after leaving prison.

Civil rights advocates and African-American leaders praised Crist's role in pushing the issue to the center of the political agenda.

As word of the state's decision spread, some felons were overjoyed.

Grady Andrews, 38, of Clearwater had a clean record until he was convicted in 1999 on drug possession charges. But after he served his time, he said he was still being punished.

"I want to start to get back involved in the functioning of society," Andrews said. "I should get out to vote, and I can't vote."

Andrews owns a small amusement business and is studying to be a substance abuse counselor. He said voting is "one of those things that you take for granted and then, when they're gone, you realize what you're missing."

Charlene Mobsby, 42, of Clearwater has also felt the loss of her rights. Her father was a town council member in Rhode Island who instilled in her the importance of voting.

"I always voted, and I also worked at the polls, too," she said.

In 2001, she was sentenced to 18 months in prison for cocaine possession and attempted robbery, and she hasn't been able to enter a voting booth since.

"I've been turned down for many jobs because of my background," she added, saying she hopes that the state's new policy will make people look at former convicts differently.

Other states that do not allow automatic restoration of civil rights for ex-offenders are Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi and Kentucky, according to the governor's office.

Times staff writer Craig Pittman contributed to this report. Steve Bousquet can be reached at bousquet@sptimes.com

38,000 petitions to have rights restored are pending before the Florida Parole Commission.

80 percent of those are eligible for the new program.

628,000 convicted felons are in the state's criminal database.

86 percent are men, 14 percent women.

62 percent are white, 38 percent black.

515,000 would be eligible for faster restoration of civil rights.

Fast Facts:

Felons' rights

THE RIGHTS THAT CAN BE RESTORED:

- To vote

- To serve on a jury

- To run for and hold public office

- To hold a state-issued license

RIGHTS THAT CANNOT BE RESTORED:

- To own a firearm

- To request a full pardon

- To request a commutation of sentence

WHO'S NOT ELIGIBLE

A person convicted of any of the following crimes is not eligible for automatic restoration of civil rights:

- murder, attempted murder, attempted felony murder, manslaughter

- DUI manslaughter

- sexual battery, attempted sexual battery

- lewd or lascivious battery, molestation, conduct or exhibition, or upon or in the presence of an elderly or disabled person

- sexual performance by a child

- aggravated child abuse

- failure to register as sexual predator

- transmission of computer pornography

- buying or selling of minors

-kidnapping, attempted kidnapping, false imprisonment, luring or enticing a child

-aggravated battery, attempted aggravated battery

- armed robbery, attempted armed robbery, carjacking, attempted carjacking, home invasion, attempted home invasion

- poisoning of food or water

- abuse of a dead human body

- first-degree burglary, attempted first-degree burglary

- arson or attempted arson

- aggravated assault, aggravated stalking

- aggravated battery or aggravated assault on law enforcement officer

- first-degree trafficking in illegal substances

- aircraft piracy

- unlawful throwing, placing or discharging of destructive device or bomb

- facilitating terrorism

- treason

ALSO INELIGIBLE:

- habitual violent felony offender

- prison release reoffender

- sexual predator

- three-time violent felony offender

- violent career criminal

Source: Governor's Office




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